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incredible stuff. the hardest forecast is the new york city because the temperatures are kind of borderline. it may start as snow, go over to rain, a little sleet and back over to snow late. that's why the snow totals for new york, i have them down to six to ten inches. if it's all snow, it could be as much as 14 inches in new york city. that's the big question mark. hartford's going to get nailed, also all the way to southern portions of new hampshire and portland, maine. i mentioned temperatures. notice it's 38 in philly, 34 in baltimore. that's why southwards i don't think you'll get much out of this at all. that's why d.c.'s not getting snow. look how cold it is in the new england area. this is how it plays out. again, the bottom line, the worst of the storm arrives after noon today. so if you're in northern jersey, new york city area, long island, connecticut, hudson valley all the way through eastern mass and rhode island, do not be on the roads after noon today. that's the most important message everyone needs to know because if you do that and you get stuck on the roads, it's going
the heart of the city near the soul of his reign. the largest detonated outside the headquarters of assad's ruling political party papt least 53 were found dead, mangled bodies amid blazing wreckage. the other two bombs exploded outside offices of assad's feared intelligence agency, killing another 22. rebels also claimed today that their mortar rounds hit the army's central command building. damascus, the capital, was the last city to mostly hold the vicious war at bay. the rebellion began nearly two years ago, a popular uprising against the 42-year dictatorship of the assad family. neighborhoods have turned to rubble. 70,000 people are dead, and refugees are pouring over the borders. some of the leaders of the opposition groups fighting in syria are not in syria tonight. they're in cairo for talks, and that's where we find our correspondent clarissa ward tonight. clarissa, what are they saying about the bombing, and what is the point of the talks there? >> reporter: well, scott, unsurprisingly, the opposition has released a statement condemning today's bombing and saying that the assad
rounds hit the army's central command building. damascus the capital was the last city to mostly hold the vicious war at bay. the rebellion began nearly two years ago, a popular uprising against the 42-year dictatorship of the assad family. neighborhoods have turned to rubble. 70,000 people are dead and refugees are pouring over the borders. some of the leaders of the opposition groups fighting in syria are not in syria tonight. they're in cairo for talks, and that's where we find our correspondent clarissa ward tonight. clarissa, what are they saying about the bombing and what is the point of the talks there? >> reporter: well scott, unsurprisingly the opposition has released a statement condemning today's bombing and saying that the assad regime was to blame for this attack. of course, the assad government saying it was, in fact extremist elements within the opposition who were responsible. but the meetings that are going on here in cairo among the syrian opposition are essentially to determine the conditions for possible talks between the syrian opposition and the assad regime. tho
hometown. chicago. and address the growing gun violence gripping that city. trace gallagher has that part of our story. is he live in los angeles. hey, trace. >> and shannon if you look at the numbers in chicago you can see why the red alert is flashing in that city. look at this. last year there were 506 murders in the city of chicago. that's a 16% increase, a significant increase. take a rook just this year 42 homicides already on the exact same pace as last year. there have been seven murders in chicago in just the past five days. the mayor there rahm immanuel is now flooding the streets with police, taking cops who normally do administrative work and putting them in patrol cars. now, what really brought this to a head is the murder last week of 15-year-old pendleton, an honors student. she performed at events surrounding the inauguration. gunned down in a park near her school. police believe it was a case of mistaken identity. the reverend jesse jackson led a march this weekend to the park where she was shot and killed. jackson is now calling on president obama to step in and help his
september, for instance, new york city's board of health limited sugared drinks and sodas to 16 ounces or less. mayor michael bloomberg praised the prohibition that takes effect march 12th. >> this is the single biggest step any city i think has taken to curb obesity, but certainly not the last step that lots of cities are going to take. and we believe that it will help save lives. >> suarez: and today, continuing her long-running "let's move" campaign, first lady michelle obama-- along with big bird of "sesame street"-- issued new public service announcements encouraging kids to get active and eat healthy. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging! >> suarez: if a "healthy" trend is developing, it still has a long way to go. as of 2012, the c.d.c. estimated more than one-third of american adults and one out of three of children were obese. we examine today's numbers and the larger challenges obesity still presents with two people who have studied the epidemi
'll ask new york city mayor's michael bloomberg if he'll run for president in 2016. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >> let's begin today with the rally on wall street. major gains that can affect your retirement savings and more. dow jones industrials completely erased a steep drop earlier in the week. let's go live to felicia taylor in new york. what happened, felicia? >> ben bernanke in his testimony in washington basically saying that we are going to see quantitative easing through 2016. that's what the market is focused on. yes, we've got better than expected numbers on manufacturing and home sales but when they heard that ben bernanke still believes we aren't going to see unemployment drop to 6.5% until 2016, that means stimulus measures are going to be in place and that's what wall street wants to hear. wo wolf? >> the 14,060, the market had collapsed in 2009, as all of us know, because of the housing crisis. it was down at one point well below 7,000, approaching 6500 and now it's more than doubled. it's a pretty dramatic comeback. >> absolutely. no question about
is the chief meteorologist at our kansas city station, kctv. >> i'll tell you what, scott the worst of it is over with. this morning, we had widespread thunder snow from kansas to missouri. snowfall rate of two to three inches per hour brought this area to its knees with our motorists. we had stranded city buses. bridges were closed for a while. now, what we're anticipating is another round for this evening perhaps another two to four inches of snowfall, some freezing drizzle right now, and wind chills in the single digits. storm total for us is about eight to 12, 14 inches of snowfall for kansas city. >> pelley: chris suchan of our station kctv. chris, thanks very much. chris mentioned thunder snow. we wondered about that. it turns out that it happens when warm, moist air collides with cold air. it's a clash of energy that creates thunder and lightning. it happens all the time in rain storms, but only rarely during a snowstorm. the labor department told us today that another 362,000 americans have joined the line for unemployment benefits, but there is good news. the number of peop
atlanta and you will get rain in your morning rush hour and mobile and pensacola and panama city. the only snowy weather is to the north behind the storm, breaking out from green bay, oshkosh to chicago. and behind that, it is extremely cold this morning from minneapolis through north dakota. that's a minus 45 windchill in north dakota this morning. that is not fun by any's standards. the next significant storm will arrive on the west coast, as we arrive throughout the day today and move to the middle of the country, especially wednesday night and thursday, potential m major winter storm in kansas and illinois and missouri and iowa. we leave you with a nice sunrise shot there, beautiful red hues. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. mine was earned in djibouti, africa, 2004. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal.
. what more can you tell us? >> the floridaen golf and react club in palm city, florida is where they played their round of golf. the president is visiting here through some friends of his in houston. he was introduced to the golf course and as a result of that has decided to take a golf buddies trip more than anything else. he took lessons from butch harmon and his son, claude. they have been talking about playing their first round of golf. it was supposed to happen at the medalist about 30 minutes away. because of the weather and the security and everything they decided to do it here. and so at about 11:00 today they went off the first tee for their first round of golf. this is not the first time they have been together. they met in 2009 in i believe the oval office when tiger was in washington to promote his golf tournament. obviously a historic day in golf to see two figures like the president and tiger woods together for the first time on the golf course. >> is it just the two of them? >> there is a foursome. jim crane who is the owner of this golf course and also owns the h
a place that's its richard king maps -- redistricting maps. the only african a member of the city council lost his seat. seems like a perfect reason why we need section 5. the only black member lost his district. this stuff happens more often in places like alabama, texas, and mississippi. so many different people are urging that section 5 be upheld. host: we have a tweet for you from maverick. guest: well, if they say it needs to be expanded, that would treat state the same. ari keep saying there is more demonstration -- discrimination in cover states and the facts don't bear that out. there's no evidence that states are evading court decrees or otherwise practicing discrimination, and that's what led to passage of section 5. section 2 remains. that was the only objection in the entire state of alabama in the last 12 years. one objection. the entire state should be remain covered under section 5 because of one objection? host: sacramento, california, dj. caller: voting is not a privilege, it is a right. i should not be restricted because of my color in that pursued. you guys never have t
start" begins right now. >>> a terrifying moment seen in real time. a kansas city restaurant was reduced to rubble. right now, a winter storm is plowing across 18 states. it's affecting some 30 million people. in some places, we're talking feet of snow, not inches. army brass taking action after that steamy affair that affected the cia. >> i'm christine romans, i'm in for john better man. >> let's get started here. at any moment we could learn whether oscar hiss torous will be granted bail, despite a charge of premeditated murder against him. the latest development from our robin kerneau who is from inside the courtroom is proceedings are adjourned right now because the state needs to find the lead investigating officer. that officer now facing attempted murder charges for allegedly opening fire on a mini bus carrying seven people. that was at 2009. at stake for hiss torous if he doesn't get bail, possibly months in prison before a full trial gets under way. we have the very latest. >> reporter: south africa woke up to shocking news this thursday morning that the investigating officer in
york times." he called koch the master showman of city hall who parlayed shrewd political instincts and plenty of chutzpah in three tumultuous terms of mayor of new york with all the tenacity, zest, and combativeness that personified his city of golden dreams. he used to walk the streets of new york asking how am i doing? ed koch was 88. [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ we've decided to we're all having such a somegreat year in the gulf, put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. yo
fadden's brilliant obituary in today's norgets. he called koch the master showman of city hall who parlayed shrewd political instincts and plenty of chutzpah in three tumultuous terms of mayor of new york with all the tenacity, zest, and combativeness that personified his city of golden dreams. he used to walk the streets of new york asking how am i doing? ed koch was 88. we're all having such a great year in the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. mcfadden's brilliant obituary in he used to walk the streets of of us who call the gulf home. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a littl
called koch the master showman of city hall who parlayed shrewd political instincts and plenty of chutzpah in three tumultuous terms of mayor of new york with all the tenacity, zest, and combativeness that personified his city of golden dreams. he used to walk the streets of new york asking how am i doing? ed koch was 88. [ speaking foreign language ] >> well, this is going to be a familiar topic around here. we're back. that was a clip from the documentary "the gatekeepers" which opens in select cities today. the film looks at israel's legendary shin bet, its intelligence agency and interviews six of its former heads. they sound a lot more like chuck hagel than bibi netanyahu. has left to human suffering on the part of the palestinians and has been banned from israel itself. like president obama, they argue for the need to engage your enemies. they say you can't make peace through military means alone. in order, these men wouldn't fit in very well in the republican party in the u.s. right now. they might even get badgered by lindsey graham and ted cruz as we saw in a congressi
of thoughtfulness that needs to happen, rather than arbitrary cuts. host: a lot more stories about your largest city, detroit, and its economic issues. what is the future of that city? guest: detroit has many great things going on, young people moving in, some great projects going on. the challenge in detroit is city government. it is not a recent issue. there are good people in the recent administration. this goes back for decades. the city government is unsustainable in terms of its finances. it needs to provide better services. we have had a review team looking at the finances. one of the question it asks is, do we need to take additional steps to get detroit's finances together? -- working better? oddly partner with the city to get that happening? detroit will be a great city again. that is critically important for the future of michigan. caller: what is happening in detroit is disgraceful. look. you run for office. you get in, you get that power, and all good ideas run out of your mind. it seems like all of the government, including state, is bought and sold to the highest bidder. you start off
bureaucracy can afford to bear the brunt of these cuts, not our military, not communities like lake city or mayo or newberry or middleberg, florida. i'm working with my friend from georgia, congressman doug collins, on the new freshmen regulatory reform working group, to help show exactly where some of these cuts are and help businesses do what they do best, they grow the economy and they create jobs, bringing in more revenues to our government. we need and we will show the president and the american people that we can cut wasteful spending without hurting kids, our seniors and that we can make responsible cuts that do not put our national security at risk. and not add to the heavy tax burden of hardworking americans that they're already carrying. it was a shame that the president and the senate have avoided working with the house in real budgeting process. i look forward to working with all my colleagues on resupporting -- restoring faith to the american people and bringing order back to this process. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. westmoreland: i t
. host: you cannot find a minimum wage job? caller: jobs in my city are very hard to come by unless you know exactly where to look. i have three scholarships. i'm trying to get a job on campus to help pay my debt. jobs are in very high demand. it is difficult. i am trying. hopefully, with the president's new policies, this could be more of an easy process. host: what is the minimum wage in oregon? caller: it was recently raised by our governor to $8.95. i cannot be certain about that. i've only read one article. host: i know there are websites out there that look at the minimum wage across the states. here's the new york times -- different economic arguments for minimum-wage, something that surely will be debated in the days after last night's state of the union address. on twitter -- let's go to brian in maryland, democrat. caller: good morning. president obama's speech was refreshing. as a proud member of the u.s. armed services that served our country more than 20 years, but we are focusing on domestic agendas and trying to invest money right here in the united. united so that was ve
it is appropriate and fitting your best city made by side as it happens have certain effects in your permit in certain effects throughout general austin's command. can you give us your sense now, you have a day-to-day basis when engaged in deliberate planning -- can you give us your sense of what the threat daughter and africom and how well-positioned africom is. >> the press and africom reliever bob rudd three major areas, one being al qaeda and the islamic mockery of, which is where the french operations and the united states is ongoing. also al-shabaab in somalia a book for her rom and also the ally ray has discussed earlier here. visit the major threats to stability militarily, but of course they have significant other wants and government as well as health issues. >> i think you've touched on something that again is a critical issue that cuts across government capacity to provide basic service, the ability of governments to function is not as, at least to respond to the true nature of the people. one of the issues we talked about is that we have had military training operations that ha
's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-authorizing section 5 in 2006, building on the leadership of my predecessor, the honorable barbara jordan, who
been, we have a devastating level of youth unemployment in cities like yours. let's focus on that because we love and care for people. we do what is good and political but may not be honest economics. host: current federal minimum wage is $7.25. bob in chesapeake, virginia, independent line. caller: representative, the minimum-wage is used as a political football. i think would be a good thing if we would set the minimum wage on all of the jobs in the country as a national need and a global competitive need instead of letting the minimum wage be brought up every so often as a political football. they need to set the minimum wage on all the jobs. then they can eliminate the union hassles and we can be more globally competitive. guest: you are correct it is used as a political football to get you some wonderful movement on your political base. if we were to think like an economist, you would not have a minimum wage. you would allow the market to generate those wages. if you're going to move to a minimum wage, are you going to have the training wage and for those folks who ar
morgan city and from tibideaux. they said why are you here? i said the same reason you are. louisiana workers go everywhere. we're proud to do it, but we would be glad to be close to home, canada and mexico. our refineries which for the first time in our nation's history -- not in history, but for the first time in many years, our manufacturing base is expanding. and finally, i would just say in this colloquy, ask the senator from north dakota, did -- has he had a conversation happen with the oil minister from canada -- i think it's minister olivier, has he talked with him at all recently? because i did have a conversation with him yesterday and i wanted to maybe share that with the senator from north dakota. mr. hoeven: i recently visited with the after, gary dewar, please go ahead and relate your conversation. ms. landrieu: i wanted to say i had a very good conversation with the canadian minister of natural resources. we had a long conversation, ten or 15 minutes and explained the importance of this development for canada. he also said to me what i just shared with you all, that he
. jenna: elizabeth prann is live in midland city, alabama, where she is covering the story since it first broke a week ago. elizabeth, take us if you would to the scene of the crime. what is happening there now? >> well, we can see officials are still combing through the scene behind us. by all accounts this was a very many could plex and a very sensitive situation. in fact bomb technicians were on site earlier this morning. we learned from the fbi. they are confirming there was a camera inside the bunker. they were speaking with jimmy lee dykes through a pipe as well as the cell phone. they witnessed the suspect's deterioration and they acted as he continued to get agitated. officials think that dykes was killed by law enforcement. fbi officials contacted us directly. they say they're processing the scene. they will send a review board that will later release the details about the shooting death of dykes. we've heard multiple questions about the drone surveillance. fbi said that military was not involved. the drone circling overhead was in fact from law enforcement. jenna. jenna: tomorro
adn from new york city steve mcmahan. thank you to both of the. as we look at the state of the union, what do you think about the tone? what about the term of the president's delivery ended the way he was saying his message? guest: i think he did what many presidents do in the state of the union address, he laid out an agenda for the future. those things tend to be kind of a list. then he built to a crescendo at the end on having a vote on the gun-control measures that he has introduced. i thought it was a terrific state of the union address that did lay out the agenda. republicans know what it is he would like to accomplish. american people know what is at stake. now we will see if congress is willing to act. guest: you had the inaugural and the state of the union. he laid out a pretty aggressive liberal agenda. obviously there will be some differences of opinion that emerge out of this. whether it be the debt ceiling, the sequester, the continuing resolution of getting the budget, the sequence of things the speech set up in terms of the beginning of this course. having said that, i
the curvature of the earth and hitting new york city on this video with that very odd background music playing. but it just shows an attitude, and i think that we cannot stand idle and tell ourselves that further sanctions have no prospect of success, especially when we saw how effective for that brief period of time where the treasury department was so concerned about the counterfeiting of $100 bills that they actually forced deployment of those financial sanctions on those institutions which the north koreans used in order to have access to hard currency. we saw at that time the result and the protests from north korea, and the result inside north korea when there was not the money to pay the military or carry out the types of programs that they do in terms of their missile and nuclear testing. so it's time to be honest with the american people that frankly our current north korean policy is not working. it hasn't worked for a long time. going forward, we need to move away from that failed north korean policy to one with energy and creativity and focus, and i think we need to learn from what
% of the global population migrates to cities by 2050. further away from the food, where the food is grown, requiring new ways to prevent waste, and enhanced nutrition. here's another illustration, one should stick out all the statistics that are thrown at you so far. in fact, if there's one thing that i hope you will remember from my remarks this morning, it would be this. i still, it's just breathtaking just to say this. a full 30-50% of the food produced in the world rots forgoes unbeaten. -- or goes unbeaten. that to me is one of the most amazing statistics i will ever articulate. up to half of our total global output. except while waste might be the problem here in the developed world, the problem and the developing countries be getting the goods to market, as we all know. roughly 85% of the food produced never crosses international borders. and given the unequal distribution of people in arable land i just mentioned, that is a major obstacle today of feeding the world. so when it comes down to is that we need to produce more, higher quality, more nutritious food, and we need to becom
of cities that were under the radar, building on some of the internal polling that we did, really honing our 50 state strategy and having all the states in training our volunteers and giving us something to do to empower them in an offer that it president norman hasn't done. all of those things started pretty quickly after the president won his first election, and we build off about. >> when were you having to sort of build this? >> i showed up in april on a full-time basis, and we really started, and this was at david's insistence, we started very early april, may doing some very intensive research to try to get a handle on what people were thinking out there. this was before the debt ceiling stuff, but we knew that people were we of the economy. and it was a weary electorate. we really wanted to sort of see how we fit in, see how they were following what was going on on the other side. so by the time the debt ceiling it, we had a pretty good sense of the landscape and what, sort of what our way was to kind of move. the dead sea was really a moment at which we were kind of galvanized the so
as a prosecutor for the city of seattle. jim in enterprise, alabama. republican line. caller: thank you. i have a couple of questions. number one, on the sequester, how much are your democrats planning on cutting out of the military budget? number two, it seems as though the president has been flip- flopping on this. when it first came out, he said it was devastating, it will kill everything in this country. now he said unless you work on a military base, you probably will not see any difference. which one of these statements is a lie? guest: actually, the president made neither of those statements. he has consistently said it will have a sizable impact that will negatively affect the country and the economy. number two, he has not now said it was only affect the military. his cabinet has been out talking about the variety of impacts it will have a bunch of different places. -- it will have in a bunch of different places. i did not vote for the budget control act, but a lot of democrats did, a lot of republicans did, and the president signed it. they all signed it thinking it would not happen.
's from huffington post. to bonnie, let's go to our republican line next, to nicholas in new york city. nicholas, welcome. >> caller: well, it's great to be here, and thank you, and i'll try to make it brief, and let me apologize to the others waiting on line. i just, very quickly, you know, i came here as a child in 1966, and they moved us up to the bronx. we came here through red cross auspices. and, you know, my dad and mom worked two and three jobs, eventually they bought real estate because they saved their money. we were subsistence farmers back home -- >> host: nicholas, where -- where was back home? you said you came here in '66. where was back home? >> caller: montenegro today on border of albanian on the coast of adriatic sea. we were albanian catholics. in fact, we were a minority amongst other minorities, but we were the minority. >> host: back to our question, how do you think these budget cuts will affect you? >> guest: well, i've been watching this thing, and it seems like i've seen this movie before. now, i've worked very hard as my mom and daddied, as my brothers do, a
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)